Connecting Renesas S7G2 to Arduino Shields


#1

The SK-S7G2 includes an Arduino header on the board. This opens up a whole world of possibilities for connecting Arduino shield(s) and doing more and more with your Renesas board.

https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/arduino-shields

We’re looking for tutorials on getting the S7G2 to work with Arduino shields. If you’ve got experience here, please let us know below. If you’ve got ideas for what you’d like to try, please let me know by replying below, too! If you are willing to write up a full tutorial, we’d like to pay for your writing or offer more sensors! Please reply to this post and we can start discussing details.

(If you’re qualified to build a tutorial but don’t have the S7G2, let us know. We may be able to provide it for you.)


#2

That’s awesome!

I’m from Brazil, and I have received a SK-S7G2 from the Renesas team from Brazil.

If possible, I would be pleased to write tutorials here.

I think about writing tutorials about the interface with Arduino Shields, or even respecting the UNO R3 pinout.

To start, I have a Grove Shield and a few Grove components which quickly allow a prototype development.

Thanks for your attention,
Andre Curvello.


#3

Andre,

Thanks for your message! Definitely interested in working with you, would like to hear more about your work with Arduino shields so far. Have you connected them to your SK-S7G2? Could you give me an explanation of what it takes, why it’s useful, what kinds of Arduino shields might be useful to people with an SK-S7G2? Do you have any specific ones that you are most interested in using? And how are Arduino shields better or worse than using the Grove shields? It’s not a test :slight_smile: I’m just trying to get more information myself and share it publicly.

Jesse


#4

Hi there, @jcasman!

I’m very glad to hear from you.

So, let me answer your questions:
Have you connected them to your SK-S7G2?

  • Not yet, but as soon as possible, after this topic, I will.

Could you give me an explanation of what it takes, why it’s useful, what kinds of Arduino shields might be useful to people with an SK-S7G2?

  • I think that it would take a proper mapping of the necessary pins, and the creation of routines/interfaces to do the proper control of peripherals connected to the Shields. Also, I think that Grove Shield and Grove Sensors would be a good choice, due to their ease of usage.
  • See here: https://www.seeedstudio.com/Base-Shield-V2-p-1378.html
  • And here: https://www.seeedstudio.com/category/Sensor-c-52.html
  • Their modules and sensors are cheap, and its usage is “plug’n play”, quick to use, quick to develop, and generic - You can plug a relay, a humidity sensor and a i2c display, and use all of them.
  • About the shields… Well, let’s talk about the S7G2: It already have USB, microSD, Ethernet, BLE, Display, CAN, Audio, Capacitive Touch. It is a full set of powerful options :wink:
  • This let us with a set of Shield Options that could be: WiFi Shield, VGA Shield, GPS Shield, Motor Shield, ZigBee Shield, etc.
  • The SK-S7G2 is well suitable for IoT applications, and a set of sensors and actuators would provide test, prototype and demonstration of its capabilities.

Do you have any specific ones that you are most interested in using?

  • Without any doubt, I think about start using my Grove Shield and my humble set of sensors and modules.
  • I have another Shield here that could be interesting too, it is named “Tatamaya Shield” (it will be announced to public soon, but I’ve received a prototype), and allow to connect ZigBee, Nordic 2.4 GHz transceivers, ESP8266, HC-SR04 ultrasonic sonar, etc.

And how are Arduino shields better or worse than using the Grove shields?

  • The only difference is in the “plug’n play” interface. Normally, Arduino Shields are focused in specific scenarios, like motor control, display, gaming, etc.
  • With IoT in mind, the usage of Grove is more suitable, because I can plug analog and digital modules, and even devices which use i2c or uart to communicate, selecting elements of my choice.

Thanks for your attention!

Att.
Andre Curvello.


#6

Andre,

This is great information. I’m looking forward to learning more about using Arduino shields with the Renesas board. Do you think mapping of the pins would be a good starting point? That seems like a short tutorial that would be “bite-sized” and very useful. Is that something you’d be interested in doing?

Jesse


#7

What’s the advantage in using the Arduino Shield over the PMOD sensor?

For example, this one is $23

Are the Arduino Shields easier to obtain than the equivalent PMOD? Is the interface easier to access, perhaps standardized? Here’s one for PMOD to VGA, but no idea how to write the code to get it to work. Is this what you mean by this:

  • Their modules and sensors are cheap, and its usage is “plug’n play”, quick to use, quick to develop, and generic - You can plug a relay, a humidity sensor and a i2c display, and use all of them.

Or, do you mean that the Grove connector sensors are quick to develop an generic. I don’t have any experience with Arduino Shields and am just wondering how they work versus Grove and PMOD.

I think this is cool and you should go ahead with it.

However, I don’t understand what the downside of using the PMOD connector on the S7G2 is?


#8

Hi @jcasman,

Yes, I agree that a pin-mapping is a good starting point, what could be described in a short tutorial using the e2studio and Synergy tools to configure.

And yes, I’m interested in doing that!

Andre.


#9

Hi @craig! Nice to hear from you.

Well… Nothing against PMOD modules!
They are more “professional”, as I can say.

And about the Grove Shield and Grove Modules, they are more like “maker” things, don’t you agree?

And, analyzing the SK-S7G2 board, for example, it only has 2 PMOD connectors.

For the Grove Shield, as you showed above, it has a lot of connectors to plug Digital/Analog/I2C, limited in the case of Arduino to One UART.

The only thing I could see that is a “con” of the Grove shield is that it does not have a proper SPI connector (but you can use the proper mapped pins, as you would do on a normal Arduino).

Look at my SK-S7G2 with Grove Shield and modules. You’ll understand :wink:

I’ve connected this elements:
-Digital LED
-Digital Button
-Digital Buzzer
-Digital Capacitive-Touch Button
-Analog Sound Sensor
-Analog Temperature Sensor
-Analog Potentiometer
-I2C Accelerometer
-I2C LCD 16x2

Thanks,
Andre Curvello


#10

That’s so cool! Yes, that picture explains things immediately. Thank you.


#11

Hello!! …@andremlcurvello

Very impressive work. I am Computer Engineering student in Manhattan College. I’m very interested in your work with connecting the Arduino shields to the S7G2. Is there any possibility you run me through how to connect sensors through the Arduino shields and how to read/ write to the shields. Can you run me through how to connect the pins and codes used, if possible. Thanks!!!